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Estonia 🇪🇪

Our Eurovision Favourites: Estonia 🇪🇪

Just 9 days out from the first quarter-final of Eesti Laul, the team look back at 28 years of Estonian entries and select their favourites.

After failing to progress past a pre-qualifying round in 1993, Estonia debuted with ‘Nagu Merelaine’ in 1994. Although they only came 24th with a mere 2 points, they then racked up an impressive four top-ten finishes over the following five years. This led to them becoming the first former Soviet country to win the contest in 2001.

Estonia’s fortunes in Eurovision have become less consistent in recent years, but there is no doubt that we still have a strong catalogue of songs to whittle down, so here we go…

  1. ‘Diamond of the Night’ – Evelin Samuel and Camille

Lee – “When I first watched 1999 during lockdown last year, this was a standout for me, even amongst all the slower-tempo, female-led songs. I really liked the ethereal vibe of it, especially with the harp. During the voting, I was glad to see it come well inside the top 10.”

Honourable mentions:

‘Rockefeller Street’ – Getter Jaani (2011)

2. ‘Everybody’ – Tanel Padar, Dave Benton & 2XL

Nana Ama – “I love ‘Everybody’ so much! The song is such a good indication of the time, as songs like these were quite fashionable back then. I also love how happy Tanel Padar, Dave Benton and 2XL were during the performance; their joy is so infectious! ‘Everybody’ is the perfect party song in my opinion, and I do feel that that it was a worthy winner, as it perfectly encapsulates what Eurovision is supposed to be – a huge party filled with colour and joy that anyone can participate in.

The song is also a part of Eurovision history as Dave Benton became the first Black winner after they were crowned the winner at the end of the night. For these reasons, ‘Everybody’ is my favourite ever Estonian entry!”

Honourable mentions:

‘Rändajad’ – Urban Symphony (2009)

3. ‘Rändajad’ – Urban Symphony (2009)

Grace – “Estonia is another country I have a few golden favourites for, but one entry stands above the rest in my opinion, and that’s ‘Rändajad’. To me, everything is perfection, from the production to the styling, from the instruments to the camera angles, and the addition of the Estonian language really puts the cherry on top.

The song is so unique and mysterious with a fantastic meaning, and the stage show is just beautiful, especially when it gets to Sandra’s violin solo, and we get the smoke machine effect. It really pulls you in, and grips you from start to finish. From a subjective and objective opinion, it’s just brilliant. I’d really love to see Estonia send something along the same vein in the coming years.”

Honourable mentions:

‘Siren’ – Malcolm Lincoln (2010)
‘Kuula’ – Ott Lepland (2012)
‘Goodbye To Yesterday’ – Elina Born & Stig Rästa (2015)
‘La Forza’ – Elina Nechayeva (2018)

Sophie – “What a hypnotising song – everything about ticks every box for most Eurovision fans. Just an absolute classic.”

Honourable mentions:

‘Siren’ – Malcolm Lincoln (2010)

4. ‘Goodbye To Yesterday’ – Elina Born & Stig Rästa (2015)

Curtis – “An instant Eurovision classic for me. I absolutely adore the vintage 60’s vibe to this, and it really brought Estonia back to the forefront of the competition for the first time in several years. The staging was a moment, instantly gripping, and unique for its time. Tallinn 2016 would’ve been deserved, and to this day ‘Goodbye To Yesterday’ stands the test of time for me. More of this please Estonia.”

Honourable mentions:

‘Rockefeller Street’ – Getter Jaani (2011)
‘La Forza’ – Elina Nechayeva (2018)

Eleanor – “This was a really tough call for me with ‘Rändajad’ and ‘La Forza’ also fighting for my top spot, but ultimately, I am a sucker for a good narrative!

Like most Eurofans, when it comes to voting on the night of the final, I don’t just vote for the song, I vote for the whole package, and ultimately what really made this song work for me was the performance, and namely, the emotions that Elina and Stig brought to it. The looks exchanged between them made you feel that you were intruding on something personal, and the harmonies they created vocally reinforced that beautifully. The camera angles added drama to Elina’s entrance as the scorned woman, and the cherry on the cake of the staging for ’Goodbye To Yesterday’ for me, is Elina’s beautifully timed single tear towards the end of the entry.

Ultimately, the performances Stig and Elina are able to give on stage give sincerity to what, with the wrong staging, could have been a fairly cheesy retro style number. This has meant, for me, that the number has stood the test of time, and become one of the songs that I dramatically sing along to at the top of my lungs in the car every time it comes on. Every single time. Without fail.”

Honourable mentions:

‘Through My Window’ – Sandra (2006)
‘Rändajad’
– Urban Symphony (2009)
‘Kuula’ – Ott Lepland (2012)
‘Et Uus Saaks Alguse’ – Birgit (2013)
‘Verona’ –  Koit Toome & Laura (2017)
‘La Forza’
– Elina Nechayeva (2018)

5. ‘La Forza’ – Elina Nechayeva (2018)

AJ – “Popera at Eurovision can be hit or miss, but ‘La Forza’ was a show-stopping performance that was a highlight in Lisbon. Along with the stunning visual performance, Elina effortlessly delivered flawless vocals that could give goosebumps to even the most staunch opera critics. ‘La Forza’ rightly achieved a top 10 finish in what was a very competitive year, but, in my opinion, it would’ve made an excellent winner!”

Honourable mentions:

‘Through My Window’ – Sandra (2006)
‘Rändajad’
– Urban Symphony (2009)
‘Goodbye To Yesterday’ – Elina Born & Stig Rästa (2015)

6. ‘Storm’ – Victor Crone (2019)

Liv – “I love ‘Storm’ as much as I love ‘Kuula’ so this was a really hard choice, but anyone who knows me will be aware of how much I love what could be considered a ‘paint-by-numbers’ male pop song.

I will admit that on the night, Victor’s performance was definitely not the strongest, but, as a studio track, it’s such a strong tune. I know it isn’t too popular amongst fans, especially after the spectacle that was ‘La Forza’ the previous year, but it was exactly the kind of song I love to hear in the contest. It’s been in my 2019 top 3 ever since it was released, and on some occasions, I’ve made it my winner. I’m grateful we got to see it at Eurovision, because it introduced me to Victor’s other music, and to this day I’m still a huge fan of his current releases. He found himself at the top of my rankings for Melodifestivalen 2020, so if he ever does return to Eurovision I don’t doubt that he’ll be one of my favourites again.”

Honourable mentions:

‘Mere Lapsed’ – Koit Toome (1998)
‘Rändajad’ – Urban Symphony (2009)  
‘Kuula’ – Ott Lepland (2012)
‘Et Uus Saaks Alguse’ – Birgit (2013)
‘Goodbye To Yesterday’ – Elina Born & Stig Rästa (2015)
‘The Lucky One’ – Uku Suviste (2021)

So, can Estonia come back in 2022 and make the Grand Final in Turin? Only time will tell… But, in the meantime check out our wish list for artists that we’d like to see at Eesti Laul this year here.

Do you agree with our favourites? Are there any major omissions? Be sure to let us know on Twitter, and in the comments below.



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